Clifford Primary School

Clifford Primary School

Religious Education

Religious Education

INTENT        

What RE looks like in our school:

·         It follows the long-term plan, which is based on the Herefordshire Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education 2020-2025; which is more systematic than the old syllabus.

·     The new syllabus contains additional guidance on religions and worldviews, and incorporates

        Key questions from the ‘Understanding Christianity’ resource.            

·         RE teaching involves watching video evidence, looking at photographs, virtual tours, listening to and reading sacred texts, people’s responses, ideas and opinions to become more well-informed about both religious and non-religious viewpoints.

·         Trips are provided (eg. to places of worship and interfaith days) to enhance knowledge and understanding.

·         It uses local community expertise eg C of E vicar and visitors representing faiths and non- religious groups to provide insights into viewpoints and belief in practice.

·         Events are laid on in school like special assemblies, festival tasters, mock Christenings, weddings, the Nativity, RE days or weeks to explore in more depth festivals or religious practices eg Holi, Diwali, Christmas, Easter etc…

·         Children learn RE in many different ways including through discussion, art, dance, music and written responses. ( Cross-curricular links)

·         Children are taught to understand and appreciate the beliefs and values of other people who live both in their local community and in the wider world.

·         They understand how what people believe affects the way they live their lives.

·         They are encouraged to use this knowledge and understanding to discuss the questions raised by religion and to reflect upon their own ideas and ways of living.

 

 

End of KS1:

Making sense of beliefs

Pupils should be able to identify the core beliefs and concepts studied and give a simple description

of what they mean. They should be able to give examples of how stories show what people believe (e.g. the meaning behind a festival). Children should give clear, simple accounts of what stories and other texts mean to believers.

Understanding the impact

They should be able to  give examples of how people use stories, texts and teachings to guide

their beliefs and actions. They should be able to give examples of ways in which believers put their beliefs into practice.

Making connections

Pupils should be able to think, talk and ask questions about the ideas they have been studying. They should also be able to give a good reason for the views they have expressed.

 

End of lower KS2:

Making sense of beliefs

Pupils should be able to identify and describe the core beliefs and concepts studied. They should also make clear links between texts/sources of authority and the core concepts studied. They will be able to offer informed suggestions about what texts/sources of authority can mean and give examples of what these sources mean to believers.

 

Understanding the impact

Pupils can make simple links between stories, teachings and concepts studied and how people live, individually and in communities. They should be able to describe how people show their beliefs in how they worship and in the way they live. They will be able to  identify some differences in how people put their beliefs into practice.

Making connections

Children should be able to make links between some of the beliefs and practices studied and life in the world today, expressing some ideas of their own clearly. They should be able to raise important questions and suggest answers about how far the beliefs and practices studied might make a

difference to how pupils think and live. They can give good reasons for the views they

have and the connections they make.

 

End of KS2:

Making sense of beliefs

Pupils should be able to identify and explain the core beliefs and concepts studied, using examples from texts/sources of authority in religions and non-religions. They should be able to describe examples of ways in which people use texts/sources of authority

to make sense of core beliefs and concepts. They will be able to give meanings for texts/sources of authority studied, comparing these ideas with some ways in which

believers interpret texts/sources of authority.

Understanding the impact

Pupils should be able to make clear connections between what people believe and how they live, individually and in communities. Using evidence and examples, they will be able to show

how and why people put their beliefs into practice in different ways, e.g. in different communities, denominations or cultures.

Making connections

Pupils should be able to make connections between the beliefs and practices studied, evaluating and

explaining their importance to different people (e.g. believers and atheists). They will be able to reflect on and articulate lessons people might gain from the beliefs/practices studied, including their own responses, recognising that others may think differently. They can consider and weigh up how ideas studied in this unit relate to their own experiences and experiences of the world today, developing insights of their own and giving good reasons for the views they have and the

connections they make.

 

IMPLEMENTATION

This is how it works:

·         Lessons are taught through a key question that runs for an extended period of time.

·         Most key questions will address one religion or non-religious group at a time before addressing a thematic question in the summer term, allowing them to build on their learning through the year with clear assessment outcomes for each unit and each phase.

·         The long-term plan sets out a logical progression from one year to the next.

·         The teaching and learning approach has three core elements which provide breadth and balance within teaching and learning about religions and beliefs.

·         Teachers plan a unit of work to address the key question and use the evidence gained from the cold task that children complete at the beginning of the unit to address any misconceptions/ gaps in knowledge.

·         Each lesson has a learning objective (or a question) which is highlighted in green if the child has met the objective.

·         Visitors, trips and events bring the subject to life.

·         Teachers make very good use of the resources we have in school (ICT/artefacts/books in RE cupboard in the resources room) and in the local area (e.g church)

·         Objectives from other subjects such as reading, writing are used in RE to reinforce and practice skills from other curriculum areas.

 

 

 

IMPACT

This is what we might see in a typical lesson:

·         Children are given lots of opportunity for partner talk, group and whole class discussions to explore their own feelings, opinions and to look at questions from different points of view.

·         Feeding back to others and to the teacher instils children with the confidence to voice their thoughts.

·         Children learning from a wide range of sources, including information technology.

·         Children encouraged to ask and answer questions, reflect upon and review their learning.

·         Children encouraged to rate, rank and process information in a variety of different ways.

·         Children supported by frameworks or adapted work to support the less able.

·         More able children are encouraged to go further in their learning by comparing and contrasting views or by further challenges.

·         Teachers with excellent subject knowledge who are enthusiastic about sharing it with the children.

 

How do we know how well children are doing in RE in Clifford Primary School?

·         Book scrutinies

·         Learning walk

·         Children interviews

·         Teacher questioning and observations

 

The impact of the teaching:

·         Children enjoy learning about RE.

·         They understand that it is ok to be different.

·         They understand that all opinions should be valued and respected.

·         They understand how what people believe affects the way they live their lives e.g. dress, practices and attitude to life.

·         They understand that believing in God is a choice that they can make as they grow into adulthood and that their beliefs may change over time and experience.

·         They understand that many religions worship the same God but in different ways.

·         They can use their knowledge and understanding to discuss the questions raised by religion.

·         They feel empowered to reflect upon their own ideas and way of living.

·         They can compare and contrast the views of different religious and non-religious communities.

·         Reviewing and building upon learning strengthens their understanding and knowledge of RE.

·         Children confidently present their knowledge and understanding in a range of ways.

·         Children make progress in line with the national average, building on their understanding from one year to the next.